Nightfall.

Rachel and her friend Becky are visiting this weekend. We didn’t think we could keep up with a couple of vivacious 30-something’s in downtown Austin on a Friday night, so I dropped them downtown tonight for an evening of fun. I was treated to a view of tonight’s lovely sunset on the way home.

Take cover.

Hurricane Dorian is currently bearing down on the Bahamas and the east coast of Florida and, likely, the east coast of the US after that.   It veered east of Puerto Rico, and, thankfully, the USVI and BVI were not devastated, per current reports.   I am hoping for the best, and if possible a swing more northward before turning northeasterly.

I follow marinetraffic.com, which shows the AIS-reported locations of boat and ship traffic across the world.  This is the current view of traffic in the western Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean.  Can you tell where Hurricane Dorian is currently?  Stay safe, everyone.

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Doo-hickeys.

First some terminology…

Sailboats have barriers along the perimeter of their decks that are meant to keep people from falling off. We call these barriers lifelines. Lifelines have gates that can be opened to let people walk through them when docked or rafted up. These gates are typically created by putting a piece of hardware that opens and closes on the lifeline at the gate called a pelican hook.

Still with me?

Pelican hooks have a tiny little ring that you pull to open them. It’s usually difficult to grab the little ring just right.

To make it easier, you can put a little fob, or lanyard, on the ring that you can more easily grab and pull the pelican hook to open the gate in the lifeline.

Long story short, today I made a set of these lanyards for Nirvana’s lifeline gates. 2 for port, 2 for starboard.

Installed…

Here’s how I made them if you’re interested.

The easy part is learning how to tie the individual cobra weave knots. So I’ll leave that out and just share one of many links that I looked at to help me figure out the basic cobra knot: here. The hard part was figuring out the best jig or setup to easily secure the cord while tying the cobra knots. I’ll share what I came up with.

What you’ll need:

– 95 paracord (1.75mm wide)

– measuring tape

– knife

– lighter or hot-knife to melt cut ends of the cord

– carabiner with 2 big paper clips attached (the jig I came up with)

– tweezers and/or a crochet hook to pull the working ends of the cord back through and under the cobra weave knots to bury them and finish the lanyard

To make a 3-1/2″ finished lanyard out of 95 paracord, I used 44″ pieces for each lanyard. Cut to length and fold that in half.

Tie a simple overhand loop knot 3 1/2 inches from the midpoint of the piece of cord. This defines the finished length of the lanyard.

The carabiner and paper clips make up my jig for holding the cord while tying the cobra weave knots. Other people use different things; pegboards, wire harnesses, etc. Basically, you want something you can pull against to keep the cord taut while you are tying the cobra weave knots with the two working ends of the cord. This is what worked for me.

The carabiner can easily be clipped onto a drawer handle or hook. The paper clips make it easy to loop the 2 working ends of the cord to start the first cobra weave knot. And they make it easy to slip the finished lanyard off them as well.

Before tying the first cobra weave knot…

After tying 3 to 4 cobra knots…

Keep tying cobra weave knots (9 or 10) until you have about 1 inch of the loop left. Remove lanyard from carabiner and paper clips.

To finish the lanyard, you need to pull the working ends of the cord back under the length of cobra weave knots that you just tied. This will bury them and keep the lanyard from coming untied when it is in use. This is where the tweezers and/or crochet hook come in. I pulled the working ends under about 4 or 5 of the knots.

Then trim and melt the cut ends of the cords; the finished lanyard…

Good luck!

Momma’s got a brand new bag.

My boat sewing projects continue. This week I made a pair of new halyard bags for Nirvana. These replace the tattered ones that originally came with the boat.

They sit on the bulkhead in the cockpit and stow all lines coming from the rope clutches on the top of the house.

Nice!

They are made from vinyl-coated polyester mesh, Phifertex Plus, which has a slightly tighter weave than the original material. I added grommets in the bottom of each pouch to help water drain.

Old friend.

Today Monte, Kurt and I sailed Cupholder to our favorite cove, to check out the reopened and recently upgraded Arkansas Bend Park.  We walked ashore and checked out the new bath houses, parking lot, playground, and campsites.  I checked on a couple of my geocaches.  We anchored and floated for a while.  It was nice to experience the lake again from our favorite wooden boat.

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Frosé in the house!

It is HOT in Austin this summer. A cool drink goes a long way to make you forget the temperature outside. I have recently been introduced to a lovely pink frozen beverage called Frosé, made from rosé wine, but presenting as a slushie. Brick Oven Pizza served up my first one (and several since then). Pretty good!

Ever since then I’ve wanted to try making my own. We have a Cuisinart electric ice cream maker which we use to make delicious sorbets. So, I asked myself, “Self, can our ice cream maker successfully make frosé?”

The answer is, “YES!”

Today I conducted a test run. Inputs:

    – 1 Bottle of chilled rosé wine
    – 1/3 c chilled simple syrup (see recipe below)
    – 1 Cuisinart ice cream maker w/ pre-frozen canister. Our model is ICE-25R but is likely replaced by a newer model by now.

Pour wine into the canister, add simple syrup, and stir. Put canister in ice cream maker and start her up. At 15 minutes it was freezing nicely.

I ran it for another 10 minutes and it looked ready.

I scooped some into a wine glass, added a paper straw (no plastic!), and put the rest into the freezer for later.

Delicious! I highly recommend. Cheers!

Simple syrup recipe:

– Heat 2 cups sugar and 2 cups water in a saucepan over medium heat. Boil 1 minute. Cool and refrigerate.

And one burgee will rule them all…

Monte recently relaunched our home-built 17′ Wittholz-designed wooden catboat, Cupholder, in Lake Travis. We spent countless hours making her, and even more sailing and playing with her on the lake. It’s nice to see her back.

Ten years ago I made nautical signal flags, aka burgees, of the letter B for ours and our friends’ boats on B-dock. Somewhere along the line, Cupholder’s was misplaced. So this morning I made another B-dock burgee for her.

Nice. Very nice. 🙂

Lighthouses.

Today is National Lighthouse Day!  So, to give a nod to these historic and important navigation aids and the people who keep them running, here are a few I captured in the last year…

Cape Florida Lighthouse, Key Biscayne, from the outside:

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and from the inside:IMG_6877

Hopetown, Great Elbow Cay, Bahamas:IMG_7840

Gray’s Harbor Lighthouse, Westport, Washington, from the outside:

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And the inside:OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Admiralty Head Lighthouse, Coupeville, Washington: OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mukilteo, Washington:

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I look forward to capturing many more.

Hot fun in the summertime.

Fran and Aaron came down to Austin for a visit. They just returned home yesterday. Whoooo, it was HOT while they were here. But they were troopers and hung in there, as we spent most of their time here outdoors.

We spent a couple of days and a night playing on the lake on Nirvana. We spent another morning sailing the newly relaunched Cupholder around as well.

We played multiple tournaments of corn-hole and pool and mario karts. And we sampled a good bit of Tex-Méx, BBQ, and backyard grill-fare.

We spent a day down at Barton Springs Pool, hitting Sno-Beach on the way home for the best sno-cone evah.

We walked 9 holes of golf. And then topped it all off with a few rounds of Rummikub and some beer at Live Oak Brewery, which is thoughtfully placed just across the street from the Austin airport.

They braved it all. We had a blast. Keeto can’t wait until they come back again. 🙂

Portsmouth & Norfolk.

After taking care of the boat yesterday, Lori and I walked around historic Portsmouth. This place is rich with history, homes dating back to the 1700s.

I haven’t talked much about the heat here, but it has been brutally hot and humid for the last two weeks. The east coast is covered with heat advisories. So, while we walked around town, the streets were deserted. The only other folks we ran into were cruisers from another sailboat we passed yesterday. No matter, it was fun to get out and walk around. And last night a front blew through, bringing cooler temps (and rain).

Today we took a foot ferry across the Elizabeth River to Norfolk.

We toured the Nauticus Museum and the USS Wisconsin that is on display there.

This ship played important roles in WWII, the Korean War, and Desert Storm. Amazing; six decades of service.

I am headed back home today.  Thanks for the adventure, Lori!

 

(Note:  If you’d like to read the entire 2 week adventure from the beginning, THIS LINK will take you to the first post in the series.)

MM0!

Day 14 – 8 bridges. 1 lock. 12 miles. On the road, again! We left the dock right before the 7AM opening of the Battlefield Bridge.

Immediately after the bridge is Great Bridge Lock connecting the freshwater Albemarle & Chesapeake Canal to the south, and the saltwater Elizabeth River to the north, lowering us one foot as we traveled north.

After this, there was only one more bridge for which we had to time our arrival, as it doesn’t open during morning rush hour.

All the other bridges are either fixed or are usually in the open position; even the bridge that delayed our arrival.  Below, you can see Norfolk beyond the formerly broken bridge.

We got an up-close view of Norfolk Naval Shipyard (Est. 1767!) as we motored past.

It felt really good to pull into Trident’s new home slip. Mission accomplished!

The next post in our ICW journey:  https://sheila365.com/2019/07/23/portsmouth-norfolk/

(Note:  If you’d like to read the entire 2-week adventure from the beginning, THIS LINK will take you to the first post in the series.)